Object photo modern photographs the thomas walther collection 1909 1949. Object: Photo. Modern Photographs: The Thomas Walther Collection 1909 2019-02-06

Object photo modern photographs the thomas walther collection 1909 1949 Rating: 7,3/10 664 reviews

Modern Photographs from the Thomas Walther Collection, 1909

object photo modern photographs the thomas walther collection 1909 1949

This perspective provides new insight into the singular nature of each work and the density of references that each contains while also acknowledging the cultural importance of photography from the interwar period--as well as the rarity of its best examples. Mitra Abbaspour is an art historian and curator, formerly Associate Curator in the Department of Photography at the Museum of Modern Art. The Museum of Modern Art, New York, Thomas Walther Collection. Middle, right: Aleksandr Rodchenko Russian, 1891—1956. Jim Coddington has served as The Agnes Gund Chief Conservator at The Museum of Modern Art since 2002. Franz Roh and Maurice Tabard are deservingly highlighted in the two spaces, with a dizzying array of other lesser known names filling in the harmonies.

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Object:Photo

object photo modern photographs the thomas walther collection 1909 1949

Although the digital replicas of photographs cannot be downloaded, they can be viewed in detail. Text by Isabel Tejeda, Valery Dymshits, Victor Margolin. Preselection is to be expected in an exhibition, but not with an interactive tool. Made on the street and in the studio, intended for avant-garde exhibitions or the printed page, these objects provide unique insight into the radical intentions of their creators. Photographic connoisseurs perusing the Walther Collection do not have to rely on detecting the steely sheen of a print: chemical analysis confirms it. The new idea here is that the collection is seen not as a standard cataloged list of pictures, but as a network of information that can be sliced and diced in nearly infinite ways to gather insights. When he first began amassing avant-garde photography, Thomas Walther likely had no idea that the images would one day become a remarkable modernist collection, one that captures a defining moment in the development of the medium.

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Object:Photo

object photo modern photographs the thomas walther collection 1909 1949

There is no sense that unfamiliar works or unknown makers are somehow filler to bridge between the treasures; in fact, that entire idea seems wholly foreign to the structure of this collection. The Walther collection includes iconic images by Bernice Berenice Abbott, Alfred Stieglitz, Paul Strand, Edward Weston, and others who helped establish photography as an art form. In many ways, the acquisition of the Thomas Walther Collection in 2001 and the significant investment of resources made since that time to understand more fully the implications of its contents are a humble admission of earlier mistakes and a concerted thoughtful effort to redress them — the key figures of the period from Germany and Russia were largely overlooked, but have now been welcomed back into the fold. This opening of the usually restricted archives of museums, information traditionally found in accession files and conservation reports, and restricted to those without an appointment, is to be commended. The Thomas Walther Collection Project is made possible by The Andrew W.

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Object:Photo. Modern Photographs: The Thomas Walther Collection 1909

object photo modern photographs the thomas walther collection 1909 1949

In addition to attending to the material economies of the medium, its website underscores the importance of social and geographic networks to photographic practice and interpretation. The significance of the Walther collection lies not only in the exceptional quality of the photographs but also in their importance: these images lie at the foundation of today's photo-based world, a world of small-camera and journalistic omnipresence, dynamic and flexible graphics, and the dominance of photographic codes and representations of information. Website visitors can also compare the objects in terms of subject, style, photographic printing technique, and paper attributes. Modern Photographs: The Thomas Walther Collection 1909-1949 Published by The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Or take the case of El Lissitsky, who died in 1941 in Stalin's Russia and whose revolutionary work in photography had been of very brief duration. The exhibit returns them both the famous and the lesser known to their rightful place in the narrative, rebalancing the forces and influences of the times and clarifying the actual string of events. This photographic egalitarianism is one of the most powerful facets of both the collection and the show.

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Big Shot: ‘Object:Photo. Modern Photographs: The Thomas Walther Collection 1909

object photo modern photographs the thomas walther collection 1909 1949

Seeley, American, 1880—1955 Friedrich Seidenstücker, German, 1882—1966 Peter Sekaer, American, born Denmark. A deep selection of artist portraits and images of studios and art schools seems to point to this collecting thesis as well — not only was Walther tracking the photographic innovations, but he worked his way back to the artists, teachers, and physical places where the ideas were percolating. Berenice Abbott, American, 1898—1991 Manuel Alvarez Bravo, Mexican, 1902—2002 Gertrud Arndt, German, 1903—2000 Aurel Bauh, French, born Romania. The final gallery of the exhibition is filled with the sharp lines of city and industrial imagery. Made on the street and in the studio, intended for avant-garde exhibitions or the printed page, these objects provide unique insight into the radical intentions of their creators. The Museum of Modern Art, New York, Thomas Walther Collection.

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Thomas Walther. Collection 1909

object photo modern photographs the thomas walther collection 1909 1949

Certainly Priska Pasquer in her Cologne gallery never dreamed that a dozen of them, languishing for decades behind the Iron Curtain at an East German publishing house, would miraculously drop into her lap like Danae's shower of gold one fine day in 1966. The Museum of Modern Art, New York, Thomas Walther Collection. Peterhans, Robert Petschow, Edward W. Out of the palette cleanser of Man Ray, Duchamp, and Dada came both American Modernism Weston, Strand, Sheeler, and their active proponent Stieglitz and European Constructivism. Made on the street and in the studio, intended for avant-garde exhibitions or the printed page, these objects provide unique insight into the radical intentions of their creators. The Thomas Walther collection is in many ways a sharp corrective to this original analysis.

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Object:Photo, The Thomas Walther Collection and Modern Photographs from the Thomas Walther Collection, 1909

object photo modern photographs the thomas walther collection 1909 1949

For the collection includes outstanding examples of European avant-garde photography of the 20s and 30s, work synonymous with artistic freedom—freedom from the conventions of painting and laborious stand-camera practice, freedom to flip, inert, and recombine images, freedom to concoct new processing and printing techniques and to photograph anything from any point of view. Thematic object-based case studies demonstrate new multidimensional approaches to the photograph as a cultural and artistic object in its own right. At the height of his collecting, the conventional wisdom dispensed by curators Beaumont Newhall and later John Szarkowski was to focus on work produced in the United States and France. Lee Ann Daffner is Conservator of Photographs at The Museum of Modern Art. The Museum of Modern Art, New York.

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Object: Photo. Modern Photographs: The Thomas Walther Collection 1909

object photo modern photographs the thomas walther collection 1909 1949

To buy this book at the lowest price,. This exhibition explores photography between the First and Second World Wars, when creative possibilities were never richer and when photographers approached figuration, abstraction, and architecture with unmatched imaginative fervor. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. This perspective provides new insight into the singular nature of each work and the density of references that each contains while also acknowledging the cultural importance of photography from the interwar period--as well as the rarity of its best examples. The Thomas Walther collection consists of 347 photographs. Additionally, a symposium is being planned, with details and the date forthcoming. Constance McCabe is Head of the Photograph Conservation Department at The National Gallery of Art.

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Object: Photo. Modern Photographs: The Thomas Walther Collection 1909

object photo modern photographs the thomas walther collection 1909 1949

I was disappointed that so much of the book is devoted to provenance of the photos and to their discovery. During the first half of the 20th century, photogra phers experimented with radical new approaches to representation and abstraction to shape modern ist imagery. This vital moment is dramatically captured in the more than 300 photographs that constitute the Thomas Walther Collection at The Museum of Modern Art. Once again, there is a strong sense of consciously rebalancing the narrative, of reintroducing photographers who were part of the discussion at the time back into the agreed upon historical flow. Organized by Quentin Bajac, the Joel and Anne Ehrenkranz Chief Curator of Photography, and Sarah Hermanson Meister, Curator, with Angeliki Kounava, 12-Month Intern, Department of Photography.

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