The most remarkable woman in england poison celebrity and the trials of beatrice pace. Manchester University Press 2019-03-13

The most remarkable woman in england poison celebrity and the trials of beatrice pace Rating: 4,2/10 1105 reviews

The Most Remarkable Woman in England: Poison, Celebrity and the Trials of Beatrice Pace

the most remarkable woman in england poison celebrity and the trials of beatrice pace

By painting a picture of volatile media coverage of court cases, links between political lawyers and journalists, theatrical performances based on real cases sometimes through mock trials and of the rhetoric of sacrifice used to turn defendants into martyrs, Grunwald offers a taste of the charged atmosphere in which political trials took place. Contents List of key figures involved in the Pace case Introduction 1 The 'Fetter Hill mystery': the strange death of Harry Pace 2 'Where there are so many cruel tongues': investigations and accusations 3 'I cannot tell you, sir - I cannot tell you': mysteries and circumstances 4 'Easing the burden of the tragic widow': the making of 'Mrs Pace' 5 'Every wife in the country has opportunity': the 'tragic widow' on trial 6 'The matter is dead': a new life and some old shadows 7 '18 years of hell': gender, marriage and violence 8 'Unimaginable agonies and degradations and cruelties': justice, politics and poverty 9 'Those who have had trouble can sympathise with you': Mrs Pace and her public Conclusion Postscript Bibliography Index --. This book offers the first in-depth study of one of the most gripping trials of inter-war Britain, that of farmer's wife Beatrice Pace for the arsenic murder of her husband. Covering roughly the same time period as the History, Martineau's Autobiography, written in 1855, can be viewed as its companion text. Abused by her husband and then impoverished by his death, she was then—as some saw it—unjustly hounded by the state. It's interesting to read that, as frequently happens today, her case became an entertainment spectacle. Reviews A fascinating analysis of one woman's domestic disaster, the power of the press and public opinion.

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Obscene Desserts: The Most Remarkable Woman in England: Now available

the most remarkable woman in england poison celebrity and the trials of beatrice pace

Based on extensive research, it locates the Pace saga in the vibrant world of 1920s press reporting and illuminates a forgotten chapter in the history of civil liberties by considering the debates the case raised about police powers and the legal system. I've already noted from history journals of my last book, The Most Remarkable Woman in England: Poison, Celebrity and the Trials of Beatrice Pace which appeared at the end of last year. For the political extremes, courtrooms were stages to be used for undermining any truth in the justice system. You will have to read the book to find out! Many thanks to both reviewers for the careful readings and positive verdicts. The history being recounted here is that of Harry Pace, a quarryman and sheep farmer who died in 1928 slowly and painfully, aged just 36, and his wife Beatrice Pace who was accused of murdering her husband by poisoning him. Rather he also focuses on the period's celebrity culture, the role of the press, the development of public interest and the police.

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The most remarkable woman in England

the most remarkable woman in england poison celebrity and the trials of beatrice pace

The E-mail message field is required. She was alleged to have poisoned him with arsenic. List of key figures involved in the Pace case Introduction 1 The 'Fetter Hill mystery': the strange death of Harry Pace 2 'Where there are so many cruel tongues': investigations and accusations 3 'I cannot tell you, sir - I cannot tell you': mysteries and circumstances 4 'Easing the burden of the tragic widow': the making of 'Mrs Pace' 5 'Every wife in the country has opportunity': the 'tragic widow' on trial 6 'The matter is dead': a new life and some old shadows 7 '18 years of hell': gender, marriage and violence 8 'Unimaginable agonies and degradations and cruelties': justice, politics and poverty 9 'Those who have had trouble can sympathise with you': Mrs Pace and her public Conclusion Postscript Bibliography Index. Spanning settings from the Pace's lonely cottage in the Forest of Dean to the House of Commons and using sources ranging from meticulous detective reports to heartfelt admirers' letters, The most remarkable woman in England combines serious scholarship with vivid storytelling to bring to life the extraordinary lives of ordinary people between the wars. The public's response was startling, and letters sent by Beatrice's admirers provide a rare glimpse of the reading public in the past. Beatrice was more than a figure of public curiosity, and her case caused no small amount of political debate. And then there's the grand sweep of the narrative, beginning in the bleak poverty of an obscure cottage in the Forest of Dean, acted out finally on the national stage.

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The Most Remarkable Woman in England: Poison, Celebrity and the Trials of Beatrice Pace

the most remarkable woman in england poison celebrity and the trials of beatrice pace

In Women's History Review, a by Caitriona Clear is currently appearing as 'advance access' online meaning that it hasn't yet appeared in the print version. She was alleged to have poisoned him with arsenic. Based on extensive research, it locates the Pace saga in the vibrant world of 1920s press reporting and illuminates a forgotten chapter in the history of civil liberties by considering the debates the case raised about police powers and the legal system. The press consistently idealised Beatrice as a doting wife and caring mother, and she was also the object of an unprecedented outpouring of public generosity. A fascinating analysis of one woman's domestic disaster, the power of the press and public opinion. In analysing the Pace case, John Carter Wood offers an in-depth exploration of attitudes towards inter-war crime, gender, media sensation and criminal justice, and at the same time delivers a comprehensive overview of a murder mystery that captivated the nation.

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The Most Remarkable Woman in England: Poison, Celebrity and the Trials of Beatrice Pace

the most remarkable woman in england poison celebrity and the trials of beatrice pace

Is there any novelist who could have got this extraordinary story so perfectly right, inventing it: the violence at the heart of it, the suspense, the succession of revelations, the passions so raw and inchoate that they have a mythic force? John quotes from numerous newspaper articles, court filings, and letters sent to the accused and her attorneys. A complete list of reviews. A riveting tale from the golden age of press sensationalism, the book offers insights into the era's justice system, gender debates and celebrity culture. Abstract: This book offers the first in-depth study of one of the most gripping trials of inter-war Britain, that of farmer's wife Beatrice Pace for the arsenic murder of her husband. The fundamental question remains: did Beatrice Pace kill her husband? In this thoroughly researched and clearly-argued study, John Carter Wood is not solely concerned with the usual question of whether or not Mrs Pace was guilty. It demonstrates that serious scholarship and vivid storytelling need not be mutually exclusive. He also discusses the views held at the time about domestic violence.

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John Carter Wood, ‘The Most Remarkable Woman in England’: Poison, Celebrity and the Trials of Beatrice Pace (Manchester and New York: Manchester University Press, 2009), pp. xvi + 269. ISBN 978 0719086182.

the most remarkable woman in england poison celebrity and the trials of beatrice pace

In the Autobiography, she further establishes the importance of women's history by inserting her own life story into the broader narrative of national progress. Quickly, The Most Remarkable Woman in England becomes not about the guilt or innocence of Beatrice Pace in the death of her husband, but a series of more complex questions for the reader to consider. These relate both to situating the case as a product of its time and in thus reading its significance, and also in evaluating the role which the media played in constructing well-defined personae for both harry and Beatrice Pace, as well as the extent to which this influenced public reaction to the trial. A riveting tale from the golden age of press sensationalism, the book offers insights into the era's justice system, gender debates and celebrity culture. For the political extremes, courtrooms were stages to be used for undermining any truth in the justice system. He examines police interviewing techniques of the day.

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The Most Remarkable Woman in England: Poison, Celebrity and the Trials of Beatrice Pace by John Carter Wood

the most remarkable woman in england poison celebrity and the trials of beatrice pace

The English Historical Review, 129 538 , 756-758. The long-drawn-out inquest and subsequent trial were the sensational news story of their day, not just locally in the Forest of Dean but also nationally, with details both revealed and amazingly kept hidden about infidelities, domestic violence and other dark secrets. Series Title: Responsibility: John Carter Wood. You will have to read the book to find out! A riveting tale from the golden age of press sensationalism, the book offers insights into the era's justice system, gender debates and celebrity culture. Based on extensive research, it locates the Pace saga in the vibrant world of 1920s press reporting and illuminates a forgotten chapter in the history of civil liberties by considering the debates the case raised about police powers and the legal system. You will have to read the book to find out! Spanning settings from the Pace's lonely cottage in the Forest of Dean to the House of Commons and using sources ranging from meticulous detective reports to heartfelt admirers' letters, The most remarkable woman in England combines serious scholarship with vivid storytelling to bring to life the extraordinary lives of ordinary people between the wars. A poor woman from an isolated village, Beatrice was transformed into a household name when, although accused of a crime that might lead her to the gallows, she was also idealised as a wife and mother in newspaper stories that give insight into the gender debates of the 1920s.

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John Carter Wood, ‘The Most Remarkable Woman in England’: Poison, Celebrity and the Trials of Beatrice Pace (Manchester and New York: Manchester University Press, 2009), pp. xvi + 269. ISBN 978 0719086182.

the most remarkable woman in england poison celebrity and the trials of beatrice pace

Bingham, Adrian 2014-06-01 00:00:00 756 Book Re vie ws Chapter Five explores how performative aspects of political trials might help us to rethink political justice in the Weimar years. John Carter Wood tells a spellbinding story of murder, using the trials of the accused Beatrice Pace to reflect the nature of celebrity culture, the legal system, and gender relations in 1920s Britain. Is there any novelist who could have got this extraordinary story so perfectly right, inventing it: the violence at the heart of it, the suspense, the succession of revelations, the passions so raw and inchoate that they have a mythic force? In the of Crime, Media, Culture, Lucy Williams who is herself a specialist on the history of writes: John Carter Wood's The Most Remarkable Woman in England may at first seem little more than historical coverage of a real-life whodunit mystery, but this impressive scholarly work quickly shows the trial of Beatrice Pace to be a landmark court case--socially, culturally, and legally. A riveting tale from the golden age of press sensationalism, the book offers insights into the era's justice system, gender debates and celebrity culture. Her trial in Gloucester in July that year was one of the greatest legal sensations in early twentieth-century Britain, generating almost endless newspaper coverage and heated political debates about the state of the British justice system.

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